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MTH 30-20481-1 - RSD-5 Diesel Engine "Western Maryland" #1689 w/ PS3

MTH Electric Trains

  • 29796
  • Save $ 51


Product Specification:

  • Road Name: Western Maryland
  • Road Number: 1689
  • Product Line: RailKing
  • Scale: O Scale
  • Release: June 2018

Features:

  • Intricately Detailed, Durable ABS Body
  • Die-Cast Truck Sides, Pilots and Fuel Tank
  • Metal Chassis
  • Metal Handrails and Horn
  • Authentic Paint Scheme
  • Metal Wheels, Axles and Gears
  • (2) Remote-Controlled Proto-Couplers
  • Prototypical Rule 17 Lighting
  • Directionally Controlled Constant Voltage LED Headlights
  • (2) Precision Flywheel-Equipped Motors
  • Operating ProtoSmoke Diesel Exhaust
  • Onboard DCC/DCS Decoder
  • Locomotive Speed Control In Scale MPH Increments
  • 1:48 Scale Proportions
  • Proto-Sound 3.0 With The Digital Command System Featuring Freight Yard Proto-Effects
  • Unit Measures: 14 1/2" x 2 1/2" x 3 3/4"
  • Operates On O-31 Curves 
Diesel DCC Features
  • F0 Head/Tail light
  • F1 Bell
  • F2 Horn
  • F3 Start-up/Shut-down
  • F4 PFA
  • F5 Lights (except head/tail)
  • F6 Master Volume
  • F7 Front Coupler
  • F8 Rear Coupler
  • F9 Forward Signal
  • F10 Reverse Signal
  • F11 Grade Crossing
  • F12 Smoke On/Off
  • F13 Smoke Volume
  • F14 Idle Sequence 3
  • F15 Idle Sequence 2
  • F16 Idle Sequence 1
  • F17 Extended Start-up
  • F18 Extended Shut-down
  • F19 Rev Up
  • F20 Rev Down
  • F21 One Shot Doppler
  • F22 Coupler Slack
  • F23 Coupler Close
  • F24 Single Horn Blast
  • F25 Engine Sounds
  • F26 Brake Sounds
  • F27 Cab Chatter
  • F28 Feature Reset

Overview:

The American Locomotive Company pioneered the multi-purpose "road switcher" design in 1941 with its 1000 hp RS-1. Alco's designers added a second, shorter hood to a basic switcher to make room for a steam boiler for passenger train heat. The short hood also afforded the crew additional accident protection. Smoother-riding trucks made Alco's new design suitable for the higher road speeds that would be daunting in a typical switcher.

In 1946, Alco cataloged the first six-axle version of its road switcher, the RSC-2. Designed for operation on the lighter rail found on branch lines and short lines, the engine used two more axles to spread out its weight. The trucks were a so-called "A1A" configuration: the two end axles had traction motors while the middle wheels were unpowered idlers.

In 1951, the Chicago and North Western asked Alco to build a six-axle version of its RS-3, this time with all axles powered. The body and the 1600 hp Alco 244 prime mover were the same as used in the RS-3, but the additional traction motors gave the new model RSD-4 stronger low-speed performance. The longer trucks were both smooth-riding and more suitable for lighter rail. The design proved to be a winner, and a dozen railroads purchased the RSD-4 and its near-identical twin, the RSD-5, which sported an improved GE generator.


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