{"id":1752929173563,"title":"MTH 20-5725-1 - L-5 Electric \"Pennsylvania\" w\/ PS3","handle":"20-5725-1","description":"\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eProduct Specification:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRoad Name:\u003cspan\u003e Pennsylvania\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRoad Number: \u003cspan\u003e 3928\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eProduct Line: Premier\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eScale: O Scale\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eEstimated Release: June \u003cspan\u003e2019\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eFeatures:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eIntricately Detailed, Die-Cast Metal Body\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDie-Cast Truck Sides \u0026amp; Pilots\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMetal Chassis\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMetal Handrails and Horn\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e(2) Handpainted Engineer Cab Figures\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eAuthentic Paint Scheme\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMetal Wheels, Axles and Gears\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e(2) Remote-Controlled Proto-Couplers\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003ePrototypical Rule 17 Lighting\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDirectionally Controlled Constant Voltage LED Headlights\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eLighted LED Cab Interior Light\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eIlluminated LED Number Boards\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eLighted LED Marker Lights\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e(2) Precision Flywheel-Equipped Motors\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMechancially Operating Pantographs\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eOnboard DCC\/DCS Decoder\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eLocomotive Speed Control In Scale MPH Increments\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e1:48 Scale Proportions\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eProto-Sound 3.0 With The Digital Command System Featuring Passenger Station Proto-Effects\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eUnit Measures: 20 x 2 1\/2 x 4 5\/8\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eOperates On O-72 Curves\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cb\u003eDiesel DCC Features\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF0 Head\/Tail light\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF1 Bell \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF2 Horn \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF3 Start-up\/Shut-down \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF4 PFA \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF5 Lights (except head\/tail)\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF6 Master Volume \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF7 Front Coupler \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF8 Rear Coupler \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF9 Forward Signal \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF10 Reverse Signal \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF11 Grade Crossing \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF12 Panto Auto\/Manual \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF13 Front Panto Up\/Down \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF14 Rear Panto Up\/Down \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF15 Idle Sequence 2 \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF16 Idle Sequence 1 \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF17 Extended Start-up \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF18 Extended Shut-down \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF19 Train Marker\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF20 Ditch Light Flash\/Std\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF21 One Shot Doppler \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF22 Coupler Slack \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF23 Coupler Close \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF24 Single Horn Blast \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF25 Engine Sounds\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF26 Brake Sounds\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF27 Cab Chatter\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF28 Feature Reset\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eOverview:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eBy the middle of the Roaring Twenties, the steam engine was a century old but electric power was still new and magical. Widespread electrification of households had gathered speed only after World War I, and Americans had just begun to buy plug-connected appliances. In the world of railroading, as in American society at large, many envisioned a world transformed by electricity. The Pennsylvania Railroad, the self-proclaimed Standard Railroad of the World, was just beginning to construct the largest electrified corridor in the United States.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn that world, the Pennsy's new L5 electrics - which look flat-out weird to to 21st century eyes - were right in step with the times. Like most electrical equipment of the era, the L5 was designed to look massive, powerful and solidly dependable. Its dark riveted exterior was a perfect match with the heavyweight passenger cars that had only recently replaced wood rolling stock. In an era before electrical gear was miniaturized, the L5's front and rear hoods concealed four massive motors that turned the two jackshafts that transmitted power through side rods, steam-locomotive style, to the drivers.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eFirst outshopped by the Pennsy's Altoona shops in 1924, the L5 was intended to be a univeral locomotive - equally adept in the road's 600-volt third-rail DC tunnels under the Hudson River, where the two-unit DD1 was king, and on the 11,000 volt overhead AC-powered mainline the Pennsy was just beginning to build. With 80\" drivers, probably the largest ever applied to an electric locomotive, the L5 was designed to haul the Pennsy's crack limiteds at 70 mph.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn the end, however, the L5 was a disappointment, and the 24 L5's turned out to be Pennsy's last jackshaft locomotives. Its major downfall was its long, rigid 22' wheelbase - nearly three times that of the successful DD1 - which made it less than nimble over complicated trackwork. (By comparison, the Swiss \"Crocodile\" electric, another jackshaft electric of the same era, had an articulated wheelbase that made it a highly successful, slow-moving mountain goat that served for decades in the Swiss Alps.) \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAnother issue with the L5 was weight distrubution: the heavy motors at each end put an inordinate amount of weight over the unpowered end trucks, rather than over the drivers where it could help tractive effort. And in truth, the L5 was also a victim of advancing technology. Within a few years, the advent of smaller, more powerful axle-mounted electric motors would make the Pennsy's magnificent GG1 possible, which was everything the L5's designers had hoped it would be. The L5 fleet soldiered on, however, into the early 1940s, augmenting the DD1's in Penn Station service and doing freight and passenger duties on Philadelphia area mainlines.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eReturning to the Premier lineup for 2019, our L5 exhibits none of the problems that plagued the prototype, allowing you to enjoy the L5 doing what it was intended to do: happily ripping down the mainline with a crack express or high-speed freight in tow.\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2018-10-18T07:45:43-04:00","created_at":"2018-10-18T07:45:43-04:00","vendor":"MTH Electric Trains","type":"Electric Locomotive","tags":["500-1000","electric-locomotive","mth-electric-trains","pennsylvania","pre-order","premier","scale_o"],"price":71996,"price_min":71996,"price_max":71996,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":79995,"compare_at_price_min":79995,"compare_at_price_max":79995,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":16930478555195,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"20-5725-1","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"MTH 20-5725-1 - L-5 Electric \"Pennsylvania\" w\/ PS3","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":71996,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":79995,"inventory_quantity":0,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"continue","barcode":"78555195"}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1011\/0560\/products\/20-5725-1.jpg?v=1539978027"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1011\/0560\/products\/20-5725-1.jpg?v=1539978027","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eProduct Specification:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRoad Name:\u003cspan\u003e Pennsylvania\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRoad Number: \u003cspan\u003e 3928\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eProduct Line: Premier\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eScale: O Scale\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eEstimated Release: June \u003cspan\u003e2019\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eFeatures:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eIntricately Detailed, Die-Cast Metal Body\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDie-Cast Truck Sides \u0026amp; Pilots\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMetal Chassis\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMetal Handrails and Horn\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e(2) Handpainted Engineer Cab Figures\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eAuthentic Paint Scheme\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMetal Wheels, Axles and Gears\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e(2) Remote-Controlled Proto-Couplers\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003ePrototypical Rule 17 Lighting\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDirectionally Controlled Constant Voltage LED Headlights\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eLighted LED Cab Interior Light\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eIlluminated LED Number Boards\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eLighted LED Marker Lights\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e(2) Precision Flywheel-Equipped Motors\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMechancially Operating Pantographs\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eOnboard DCC\/DCS Decoder\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eLocomotive Speed Control In Scale MPH Increments\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e1:48 Scale Proportions\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eProto-Sound 3.0 With The Digital Command System Featuring Passenger Station Proto-Effects\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eUnit Measures: 20 x 2 1\/2 x 4 5\/8\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eOperates On O-72 Curves\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003cb\u003eDiesel DCC Features\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF0 Head\/Tail light\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF1 Bell \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF2 Horn \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF3 Start-up\/Shut-down \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF4 PFA \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF5 Lights (except head\/tail)\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF6 Master Volume \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF7 Front Coupler \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF8 Rear Coupler \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF9 Forward Signal \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF10 Reverse Signal \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF11 Grade Crossing \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF12 Panto Auto\/Manual \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF13 Front Panto Up\/Down \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF14 Rear Panto Up\/Down \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF15 Idle Sequence 2 \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF16 Idle Sequence 1 \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF17 Extended Start-up \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF18 Extended Shut-down \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF19 Train Marker\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF20 Ditch Light Flash\/Std\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF21 One Shot Doppler \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF22 Coupler Slack \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF23 Coupler Close \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF24 Single Horn Blast \u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF25 Engine Sounds\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF26 Brake Sounds\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF27 Cab Chatter\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eF28 Feature Reset\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eOverview:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eBy the middle of the Roaring Twenties, the steam engine was a century old but electric power was still new and magical. Widespread electrification of households had gathered speed only after World War I, and Americans had just begun to buy plug-connected appliances. In the world of railroading, as in American society at large, many envisioned a world transformed by electricity. The Pennsylvania Railroad, the self-proclaimed Standard Railroad of the World, was just beginning to construct the largest electrified corridor in the United States.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn that world, the Pennsy's new L5 electrics - which look flat-out weird to to 21st century eyes - were right in step with the times. Like most electrical equipment of the era, the L5 was designed to look massive, powerful and solidly dependable. Its dark riveted exterior was a perfect match with the heavyweight passenger cars that had only recently replaced wood rolling stock. In an era before electrical gear was miniaturized, the L5's front and rear hoods concealed four massive motors that turned the two jackshafts that transmitted power through side rods, steam-locomotive style, to the drivers.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eFirst outshopped by the Pennsy's Altoona shops in 1924, the L5 was intended to be a univeral locomotive - equally adept in the road's 600-volt third-rail DC tunnels under the Hudson River, where the two-unit DD1 was king, and on the 11,000 volt overhead AC-powered mainline the Pennsy was just beginning to build. With 80\" drivers, probably the largest ever applied to an electric locomotive, the L5 was designed to haul the Pennsy's crack limiteds at 70 mph.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn the end, however, the L5 was a disappointment, and the 24 L5's turned out to be Pennsy's last jackshaft locomotives. Its major downfall was its long, rigid 22' wheelbase - nearly three times that of the successful DD1 - which made it less than nimble over complicated trackwork. (By comparison, the Swiss \"Crocodile\" electric, another jackshaft electric of the same era, had an articulated wheelbase that made it a highly successful, slow-moving mountain goat that served for decades in the Swiss Alps.) \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAnother issue with the L5 was weight distrubution: the heavy motors at each end put an inordinate amount of weight over the unpowered end trucks, rather than over the drivers where it could help tractive effort. And in truth, the L5 was also a victim of advancing technology. Within a few years, the advent of smaller, more powerful axle-mounted electric motors would make the Pennsy's magnificent GG1 possible, which was everything the L5's designers had hoped it would be. The L5 fleet soldiered on, however, into the early 1940s, augmenting the DD1's in Penn Station service and doing freight and passenger duties on Philadelphia area mainlines.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eReturning to the Premier lineup for 2019, our L5 exhibits none of the problems that plagued the prototype, allowing you to enjoy the L5 doing what it was intended to do: happily ripping down the mainline with a crack express or high-speed freight in tow.\u003c\/p\u003e"}

MTH 20-5725-1 - L-5 Electric "Pennsylvania" w/ PS3

$ 719.96 $ 799.95
Maximum quantity available reached.
Product Description

Product Specification:

  • Road Name: Pennsylvania
  • Road Number:  3928
  • Product Line: Premier
  • Scale: O Scale
  • Estimated Release: June 2019

Features:

  • Intricately Detailed, Die-Cast Metal Body
  • Die-Cast Truck Sides & Pilots
  • Metal Chassis
  • Metal Handrails and Horn
  • (2) Handpainted Engineer Cab Figures
  • Authentic Paint Scheme
  • Metal Wheels, Axles and Gears
  • (2) Remote-Controlled Proto-Couplers
  • Prototypical Rule 17 Lighting
  • Directionally Controlled Constant Voltage LED Headlights
  • Lighted LED Cab Interior Light
  • Illuminated LED Number Boards
  • Lighted LED Marker Lights
  • (2) Precision Flywheel-Equipped Motors
  • Mechancially Operating Pantographs
  • Onboard DCC/DCS Decoder
  • Locomotive Speed Control In Scale MPH Increments
  • 1:48 Scale Proportions
  • Proto-Sound 3.0 With The Digital Command System Featuring Passenger Station Proto-Effects
  • Unit Measures: 20 x 2 1/2 x 4 5/8
  • Operates On O-72 Curves 
Diesel DCC Features
  • F0 Head/Tail light
  • F1 Bell
  • F2 Horn
  • F3 Start-up/Shut-down
  • F4 PFA
  • F5 Lights (except head/tail)
  • F6 Master Volume
  • F7 Front Coupler
  • F8 Rear Coupler
  • F9 Forward Signal
  • F10 Reverse Signal
  • F11 Grade Crossing
  • F12 Panto Auto/Manual
  • F13 Front Panto Up/Down
  • F14 Rear Panto Up/Down
  • F15 Idle Sequence 2
  • F16 Idle Sequence 1
  • F17 Extended Start-up
  • F18 Extended Shut-down
  • F19 Train Marker
  • F20 Ditch Light Flash/Std
  • F21 One Shot Doppler
  • F22 Coupler Slack
  • F23 Coupler Close
  • F24 Single Horn Blast
  • F25 Engine Sounds
  • F26 Brake Sounds
  • F27 Cab Chatter
  • F28 Feature Reset

Overview:

By the middle of the Roaring Twenties, the steam engine was a century old but electric power was still new and magical. Widespread electrification of households had gathered speed only after World War I, and Americans had just begun to buy plug-connected appliances. In the world of railroading, as in American society at large, many envisioned a world transformed by electricity. The Pennsylvania Railroad, the self-proclaimed Standard Railroad of the World, was just beginning to construct the largest electrified corridor in the United States.

In that world, the Pennsy's new L5 electrics - which look flat-out weird to to 21st century eyes - were right in step with the times. Like most electrical equipment of the era, the L5 was designed to look massive, powerful and solidly dependable. Its dark riveted exterior was a perfect match with the heavyweight passenger cars that had only recently replaced wood rolling stock. In an era before electrical gear was miniaturized, the L5's front and rear hoods concealed four massive motors that turned the two jackshafts that transmitted power through side rods, steam-locomotive style, to the drivers.

First outshopped by the Pennsy's Altoona shops in 1924, the L5 was intended to be a univeral locomotive - equally adept in the road's 600-volt third-rail DC tunnels under the Hudson River, where the two-unit DD1 was king, and on the 11,000 volt overhead AC-powered mainline the Pennsy was just beginning to build. With 80" drivers, probably the largest ever applied to an electric locomotive, the L5 was designed to haul the Pennsy's crack limiteds at 70 mph.

In the end, however, the L5 was a disappointment, and the 24 L5's turned out to be Pennsy's last jackshaft locomotives. Its major downfall was its long, rigid 22' wheelbase - nearly three times that of the successful DD1 - which made it less than nimble over complicated trackwork. (By comparison, the Swiss "Crocodile" electric, another jackshaft electric of the same era, had an articulated wheelbase that made it a highly successful, slow-moving mountain goat that served for decades in the Swiss Alps.)

Another issue with the L5 was weight distrubution: the heavy motors at each end put an inordinate amount of weight over the unpowered end trucks, rather than over the drivers where it could help tractive effort. And in truth, the L5 was also a victim of advancing technology. Within a few years, the advent of smaller, more powerful axle-mounted electric motors would make the Pennsy's magnificent GG1 possible, which was everything the L5's designers had hoped it would be. The L5 fleet soldiered on, however, into the early 1940s, augmenting the DD1's in Penn Station service and doing freight and passenger duties on Philadelphia area mainlines.

Returning to the Premier lineup for 2019, our L5 exhibits none of the problems that plagued the prototype, allowing you to enjoy the L5 doing what it was intended to do: happily ripping down the mainline with a crack express or high-speed freight in tow.