{"id":1752930189371,"title":"MTH 20-91658 - Extended Vision Caboose \"Chessie\"","handle":"20-91658","description":"\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eProduct Specification:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRoad Name: Chessie\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRoad Number: \u003cspan\u003e 903296, 903206\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eProduct Line: Premier\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eScale: O Scale\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eEstimated Release: May 2019\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eFeatures:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eIntricately Detailed, Durable ABS Body\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eStamped Metal Floors\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDetailed Car Interior\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMetal Wheels and Axles\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDie-Cast 4-Wheel Trucks\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eFast-Angle Wheel Sets\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eNeedle-Point Axles\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e(2) Operating Die-Cast Metal Couplers\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eO Scale Kadee-Compatible Coupler Mounting Pads\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eCaboose Interiors With Overhead Lighting\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDetailed Brake Wheel\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eSeparate Metal Handrails\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eBrakeman Figure\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e1:48 Scale Dimensions\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eUnit Measures: 10 3\/4\" x 2 3\/4\" x 4\"\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eOperates On O-31 Curves\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eOverview:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eBefore railroads, \"caboose\" referred to a small cookhouse on the deck of a sailing ship. Nobody knows for sure, but it was likely the 1850s before the first railroad caboose gave a train crew shelter from the weather. The Civil War era marked the emergence of boxcarlike cabin cars or conductor's cars with side and perhaps end doors, windows, a heating and cooking stove, bunks, and roof lanterns to mark the end of the train.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eManagement often resisted providing such creature comforts to crews, and it would be well into the 1870s before cabooses were widespread on American trains. And although the cupola, known then as a \"lookout\" or \"observatory,\" first appeared during the Civil War era, flat-roofed cabooses outnumbered cabin cars with cupolas well into the 1880s. By the early 20th century, however, the cupola caboose had attained its final shape, one it would keep until cabooses became extinct in the 1980s.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eBut while cupola cabooses remained pretty much the same, the freight cars in front of them were changing, becoming ever longer and taller as well. By the end of World War II, taller cars were making it harder and harder for the crewman riding the cupola to do his job: keep an eye on the train ahead. One solution, of course, was the bay windowcaboose. Another, more popular innovation was the extended vision, or wide vision caboose, which combined the extra width of a bay window with the height advantage of a cupola. Our model depicts the extended vision caboose introduced by International Car Company in 1953 and produced for two decades, which was rostered by railroads from coast to coast. Like diesels and other modern freight cars, this widely owned caboose was part of the postwar shift away from customized, railroad-specific locos and cars toward standardized designs produced in large quantities on efficient assembly lines.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMTH Premier O Scale freight cars are the perfect complement to any manufacturer's scale proportioned O Gauge locomotives. Whether you prefer to purchase cars separately or assemble a unit train, MTH Premier Rolling Stock has the cars for you in a variety of car types and paint schemes.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eVirtually every sturdy car is offered in two car numbers which makes it even easier than ever to combine them into a mult-car consist. Many of MTH's Premier Rolling Stock offerings can also operate on the tightest O Gauge curves giving them even more added versatitlity to your layout.\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2018-10-18T07:45:50-04:00","created_at":"2018-10-18T07:45:50-04:00","vendor":"MTH Electric Trains","type":"Rolling Stock","tags":["50-200","caboose","chessie","mth-electric-trains","pre-order","premier","rolling-stock","rs_caboose","scale_o"],"price":6746,"price_min":6746,"price_max":6746,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":7495,"compare_at_price_min":7495,"compare_at_price_max":7495,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":16930483535931,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"20-91658","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"MTH 20-91658 - Extended Vision Caboose \"Chessie\"","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":6746,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":7495,"inventory_quantity":-3,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"continue","barcode":"83535931"}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1011\/0560\/products\/20-91658.jpg?v=1540087648"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1011\/0560\/products\/20-91658.jpg?v=1540087648","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eProduct Specification:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRoad Name: Chessie\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eRoad Number: \u003cspan\u003e 903296, 903206\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eProduct Line: Premier\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eScale: O Scale\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eEstimated Release: May 2019\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eFeatures:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eIntricately Detailed, Durable ABS Body\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eStamped Metal Floors\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDetailed Car Interior\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eMetal Wheels and Axles\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDie-Cast 4-Wheel Trucks\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eFast-Angle Wheel Sets\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eNeedle-Point Axles\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e(2) Operating Die-Cast Metal Couplers\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eO Scale Kadee-Compatible Coupler Mounting Pads\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eCaboose Interiors With Overhead Lighting\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eDetailed Brake Wheel\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eSeparate Metal Handrails\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eBrakeman Figure\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e1:48 Scale Dimensions\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eUnit Measures: 10 3\/4\" x 2 3\/4\" x 4\"\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003eOperates On O-31 Curves\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch4\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eOverview:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h4\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eBefore railroads, \"caboose\" referred to a small cookhouse on the deck of a sailing ship. Nobody knows for sure, but it was likely the 1850s before the first railroad caboose gave a train crew shelter from the weather. The Civil War era marked the emergence of boxcarlike cabin cars or conductor's cars with side and perhaps end doors, windows, a heating and cooking stove, bunks, and roof lanterns to mark the end of the train.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eManagement often resisted providing such creature comforts to crews, and it would be well into the 1870s before cabooses were widespread on American trains. And although the cupola, known then as a \"lookout\" or \"observatory,\" first appeared during the Civil War era, flat-roofed cabooses outnumbered cabin cars with cupolas well into the 1880s. By the early 20th century, however, the cupola caboose had attained its final shape, one it would keep until cabooses became extinct in the 1980s.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eBut while cupola cabooses remained pretty much the same, the freight cars in front of them were changing, becoming ever longer and taller as well. By the end of World War II, taller cars were making it harder and harder for the crewman riding the cupola to do his job: keep an eye on the train ahead. One solution, of course, was the bay windowcaboose. Another, more popular innovation was the extended vision, or wide vision caboose, which combined the extra width of a bay window with the height advantage of a cupola. Our model depicts the extended vision caboose introduced by International Car Company in 1953 and produced for two decades, which was rostered by railroads from coast to coast. Like diesels and other modern freight cars, this widely owned caboose was part of the postwar shift away from customized, railroad-specific locos and cars toward standardized designs produced in large quantities on efficient assembly lines.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMTH Premier O Scale freight cars are the perfect complement to any manufacturer's scale proportioned O Gauge locomotives. Whether you prefer to purchase cars separately or assemble a unit train, MTH Premier Rolling Stock has the cars for you in a variety of car types and paint schemes.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eVirtually every sturdy car is offered in two car numbers which makes it even easier than ever to combine them into a mult-car consist. Many of MTH's Premier Rolling Stock offerings can also operate on the tightest O Gauge curves giving them even more added versatitlity to your layout.\u003c\/p\u003e"}

MTH 20-91658 - Extended Vision Caboose "Chessie"

$ 67.46 $ 74.95
Maximum quantity available reached.
Product Description

Product Specification:

  • Road Name: Chessie
  • Road Number:  903296, 903206
  • Product Line: Premier
  • Scale: O Scale
  • Estimated Release: May 2019

Features:

  • Intricately Detailed, Durable ABS Body
  • Stamped Metal Floors
  • Detailed Car Interior
  • Metal Wheels and Axles
  • Die-Cast 4-Wheel Trucks
  • Fast-Angle Wheel Sets
  • Needle-Point Axles
  • (2) Operating Die-Cast Metal Couplers
  • O Scale Kadee-Compatible Coupler Mounting Pads
  • Caboose Interiors With Overhead Lighting
  • Detailed Brake Wheel
  • Separate Metal Handrails
  • Brakeman Figure
  • 1:48 Scale Dimensions
  • Unit Measures: 10 3/4" x 2 3/4" x 4"
  • Operates On O-31 Curves

Overview:

Before railroads, "caboose" referred to a small cookhouse on the deck of a sailing ship. Nobody knows for sure, but it was likely the 1850s before the first railroad caboose gave a train crew shelter from the weather. The Civil War era marked the emergence of boxcarlike cabin cars or conductor's cars with side and perhaps end doors, windows, a heating and cooking stove, bunks, and roof lanterns to mark the end of the train.

Management often resisted providing such creature comforts to crews, and it would be well into the 1870s before cabooses were widespread on American trains. And although the cupola, known then as a "lookout" or "observatory," first appeared during the Civil War era, flat-roofed cabooses outnumbered cabin cars with cupolas well into the 1880s. By the early 20th century, however, the cupola caboose had attained its final shape, one it would keep until cabooses became extinct in the 1980s.

But while cupola cabooses remained pretty much the same, the freight cars in front of them were changing, becoming ever longer and taller as well. By the end of World War II, taller cars were making it harder and harder for the crewman riding the cupola to do his job: keep an eye on the train ahead. One solution, of course, was the bay windowcaboose. Another, more popular innovation was the extended vision, or wide vision caboose, which combined the extra width of a bay window with the height advantage of a cupola. Our model depicts the extended vision caboose introduced by International Car Company in 1953 and produced for two decades, which was rostered by railroads from coast to coast. Like diesels and other modern freight cars, this widely owned caboose was part of the postwar shift away from customized, railroad-specific locos and cars toward standardized designs produced in large quantities on efficient assembly lines.

MTH Premier O Scale freight cars are the perfect complement to any manufacturer's scale proportioned O Gauge locomotives. Whether you prefer to purchase cars separately or assemble a unit train, MTH Premier Rolling Stock has the cars for you in a variety of car types and paint schemes.

Virtually every sturdy car is offered in two car numbers which makes it even easier than ever to combine them into a mult-car consist. Many of MTH's Premier Rolling Stock offerings can also operate on the tightest O Gauge curves giving them even more added versatitlity to your layout.