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{"id":5895809073304,"title":"Model Railroader - Magazine - Vol. 87 - Issue 04 - April 2020","handle":"model-railroader-magazine-vol-87-issue-4-april-2020","description":"\u003cul data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\n\u003cli data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eVol. 87\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eIssue: 4\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eRelease: April 2020\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eSeries: Model Railroader\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003ePublisher: Kalmbach\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eFeatures:\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eA half century on the Virginia \u0026amp; Truckee\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003eby Dave Rickaby\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eFor many baby boomers, the path to model railroading started with a Lionel or American Flyer train set under the Christmas tree. But Donn Tolley's hobby journey started in 1963 when serving in the U.S. Air Force in Japan. He went into a store and stumbled upon a selection of brass locomotive next to the jewelry counter. After looking over the inventory, he purchased a brass HO scale Porter 2-6-0 Mogul for $10.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eWhen Donn returned to stateside in 1964, he built his first HO scale layout on a 4 x 8 sheet of plywood. Another 4 x 8-foot sheet of plywood was added when Donn and his family moved to Wisconsin two years later.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eModeling space-saving industries\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003eby Tony Koester\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eIf there's a common characteristic shared by almost every model railroader, it's lack of space. Whether we have a small shelf layout or a basement empire, there's never enough square footage to do justice to everything we'd like to model.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eAmong the most important items on our must-have list are those that support the purpose of our railroads. A scale model railroad should reflect the characteristics of its full-size counterpart. That includes its reason for being, its sources of livelihood, and the industries that supply or use the carloads that make running trains worthwhile.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCelebrating steam's last stand\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003eby Gary Hoover\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eNoted railroad photographer O. Winston Link dubbed the Norfolk \u0026amp; Western Ry. of the late 1950s \"The Last Steam Railroad in America.\" That moniker was also the title of a book published by Harry N. Abrams in 1995, that republished many of Link's iconic, mostly night photos of the waning days of N\u0026amp;W steam power. Those photos, along with the charm of railroading through the Appalachian mountains, inspired me to plan and build my latest 24 x 49-foot HO scale N\u0026amp;W model railroad.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eBuilding Wingate in O scale\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003eby Tony Koester\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003ePart 4: Maximizing the play value while operating in a confine area\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eYou're called for the KC local, second-class train No. 45, at Frankfort, Ind. It's marked up for its usual 7 a.m. departure and due to arrive at the other division point, Charleston, Ill., at 1 p.m. But that won't happen today or any other day. The law allows 16 hours to make the run, and it may take close to that again today; even the passenger trains, Nos. 9 and 10, with only three scheduled stops between division point stations, require almost three hours to cover the Third Subdivision.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eOverview:\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eModel Railroader\u003c\/em\u003e has been the leading model train magazine for the past 75 years.  Each month, we bring you step-by-step modeling projects, fascinating photo tours of model train layouts, unbiased product reviews, new product announcements, tips from the experts and much more!\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-10-07T11:13:37-04:00","created_at":"2020-10-07T11:12:50-04:00","vendor":"Model Railroader","type":"Media","tags":["3-rail","in-stock","media","model-railroader","under-50"],"price":699,"price_min":699,"price_max":699,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":699,"compare_at_price_min":699,"compare_at_price_max":699,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":36771645915288,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MRR200401-T","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Model Railroader - Magazine - Vol. 87 - Issue 04 - April 2020","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":699,"weight":181,"compare_at_price":699,"inventory_quantity":2,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":"074666012738","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1011\/0560\/products\/MRR200401_W800.jpg?v=1602083639"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1011\/0560\/products\/MRR200401_W800.jpg?v=1602083639","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":12599928488088,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.767,"height":795,"width":610,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1011\/0560\/products\/MRR200401_W800.jpg?v=1602083639"},"aspect_ratio":0.767,"height":795,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1011\/0560\/products\/MRR200401_W800.jpg?v=1602083639","width":610}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003cul data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\n\u003cli data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eVol. 87\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eIssue: 4\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eRelease: April 2020\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eSeries: Model Railroader\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003ePublisher: Kalmbach\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eFeatures:\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eA half century on the Virginia \u0026amp; Truckee\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003eby Dave Rickaby\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eFor many baby boomers, the path to model railroading started with a Lionel or American Flyer train set under the Christmas tree. But Donn Tolley's hobby journey started in 1963 when serving in the U.S. Air Force in Japan. He went into a store and stumbled upon a selection of brass locomotive next to the jewelry counter. After looking over the inventory, he purchased a brass HO scale Porter 2-6-0 Mogul for $10.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eWhen Donn returned to stateside in 1964, he built his first HO scale layout on a 4 x 8 sheet of plywood. Another 4 x 8-foot sheet of plywood was added when Donn and his family moved to Wisconsin two years later.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eModeling space-saving industries\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003eby Tony Koester\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eIf there's a common characteristic shared by almost every model railroader, it's lack of space. Whether we have a small shelf layout or a basement empire, there's never enough square footage to do justice to everything we'd like to model.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eAmong the most important items on our must-have list are those that support the purpose of our railroads. A scale model railroad should reflect the characteristics of its full-size counterpart. That includes its reason for being, its sources of livelihood, and the industries that supply or use the carloads that make running trains worthwhile.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCelebrating steam's last stand\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003eby Gary Hoover\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eNoted railroad photographer O. Winston Link dubbed the Norfolk \u0026amp; Western Ry. of the late 1950s \"The Last Steam Railroad in America.\" That moniker was also the title of a book published by Harry N. Abrams in 1995, that republished many of Link's iconic, mostly night photos of the waning days of N\u0026amp;W steam power. Those photos, along with the charm of railroading through the Appalachian mountains, inspired me to plan and build my latest 24 x 49-foot HO scale N\u0026amp;W model railroad.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eBuilding Wingate in O scale\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003eby Tony Koester\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003ePart 4: Maximizing the play value while operating in a confine area\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan\u003eYou're called for the KC local, second-class train No. 45, at Frankfort, Ind. It's marked up for its usual 7 a.m. departure and due to arrive at the other division point, Charleston, Ill., at 1 p.m. But that won't happen today or any other day. The law allows 16 hours to make the run, and it may take close to that again today; even the passenger trains, Nos. 9 and 10, with only three scheduled stops between division point stations, require almost three hours to cover the Third Subdivision.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eOverview:\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eModel Railroader\u003c\/em\u003e has been the leading model train magazine for the past 75 years.  Each month, we bring you step-by-step modeling projects, fascinating photo tours of model train layouts, unbiased product reviews, new product announcements, tips from the experts and much more!\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Model Railroader - Magazine - Vol. 87 - Issue 04 - April 2020

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Product Description
  • Vol. 87
  • Issue: 4
  • Release: April 2020
  • Series: Model Railroader
  • Publisher: Kalmbach
Features:

A half century on the Virginia & Truckee
by Dave Rickaby
For many baby boomers, the path to model railroading started with a Lionel or American Flyer train set under the Christmas tree. But Donn Tolley's hobby journey started in 1963 when serving in the U.S. Air Force in Japan. He went into a store and stumbled upon a selection of brass locomotive next to the jewelry counter. After looking over the inventory, he purchased a brass HO scale Porter 2-6-0 Mogul for $10.

When Donn returned to stateside in 1964, he built his first HO scale layout on a 4 x 8 sheet of plywood. Another 4 x 8-foot sheet of plywood was added when Donn and his family moved to Wisconsin two years later.

Modeling space-saving industries
by Tony Koester
If there's a common characteristic shared by almost every model railroader, it's lack of space. Whether we have a small shelf layout or a basement empire, there's never enough square footage to do justice to everything we'd like to model.

Among the most important items on our must-have list are those that support the purpose of our railroads. A scale model railroad should reflect the characteristics of its full-size counterpart. That includes its reason for being, its sources of livelihood, and the industries that supply or use the carloads that make running trains worthwhile.

Celebrating steam's last stand
by Gary Hoover
Noted railroad photographer O. Winston Link dubbed the Norfolk & Western Ry. of the late 1950s "The Last Steam Railroad in America." That moniker was also the title of a book published by Harry N. Abrams in 1995, that republished many of Link's iconic, mostly night photos of the waning days of N&W steam power. Those photos, along with the charm of railroading through the Appalachian mountains, inspired me to plan and build my latest 24 x 49-foot HO scale N&W model railroad.

Building Wingate in O scale
by Tony Koester
Part 4: Maximizing the play value while operating in a confine area

You're called for the KC local, second-class train No. 45, at Frankfort, Ind. It's marked up for its usual 7 a.m. departure and due to arrive at the other division point, Charleston, Ill., at 1 p.m. But that won't happen today or any other day. The law allows 16 hours to make the run, and it may take close to that again today; even the passenger trains, Nos. 9 and 10, with only three scheduled stops between division point stations, require almost three hours to cover the Third Subdivision.

Overview:

Model Railroader has been the leading model train magazine for the past 75 years.  Each month, we bring you step-by-step modeling projects, fascinating photo tours of model train layouts, unbiased product reviews, new product announcements, tips from the experts and much more!